Long List of April Tax Measures

17 Mar

Local elections will take place on April 3, and the 15% or so of voters who bother to show will be faced with many tax hike proposals, just like we were a year ago. Here is a full list from the county website:

  • Sheriff’s Office: 35-cent property tax increase for pay increases for deputies, as well as training and equipping. This is motivated by the fact that a number of deputies have left for higher pay elsewhere. I know may people who oppose all tax increases who see the need for this tax and support it.
  • Hillsboro library: 28-cent property tax increase to fund a new Hillsboro branch of the Jefferson County Library. Efforts to establish this branch failed in 2012 and 2014.
  • Hillsboro: 1/2 cent sales tax for police.
  • Arnold: increase in business license fees in order to triple its revenue from this source to pay for police and improve streets and parks. This is after trying and failing to increase sales taxes in 2015. This seems to be part of a general strategy to increase the burdens on Arnold businesses.
  • Northwest R-1: a bond issue for various facility improvements. While taxes will not go up under this measure, it would prevent a tax from expiring in about 2034.
  • Byrnes Mill: two 1/2-cent sales taxes, one for capital improvements and one for transportation. This is down from the three taxes the city tried and failed to pass a year ago. One sales tax lost on a tie then, and another lost by three votes. Again the city blames SB5, which stopped the city’s policing for profit ticket-writing strategy, for the need for new revenue.
  • DeSoto: 1/2-cent sales tax for storm water control and parks.
  • Antonia Fire: 35-cent property tax for staffing, training, and equipment. This is less than the 50-cent tax the district tried and failed to pass in November, which lost 56-44%.

I went ahead and created a chart of April tax measures voted on and passed in each of the past 5 years, for comparison. This does not include the Prop V vehicle tax votes that each local entity held over the past couple of elections.

tax vote chart


Most JeffCo Reps Vote Against Prevailing Wage Repeal

15 Mar

One of the major union-related issues the Missouri Legislature has looked at in recent years is prevailing wage laws, which regulate and inflate what construction workers are paid for work on public construction projects. The state House passed a bill Tuesday to repeal these laws. The bill now moves to the House. According to the Post-Dispatch:

Supporters of the repeal say getting rid of the labor rule would save taxpayer dollars and make it less complicated to get government projects underway. Opponents say the law would essentially take money out of workers’ pockets.

According to MissouriNet:

A sticking point with many Republicans which represent rural districts is that contractors don’t report their wages paid, and worker pay is then skewed toward urban areas where the cost of living and wages are much higher.

The bill passed the House with 89 votes, as 20 Republicans voted no. That includes four Jefferson County GOP representatives: Elaine Gannon, Becky Ruth, Shane Roden, and Dan Shaul. Democrats Ben Harris and Mike Revis also voted no. The only JeffCo rep to support the bill was Majority Leader Rob Vescovo.

This is another example of how, even as the GOP has taken over the county, local politicians still generally side with unions, although not unanimously as they once did.

Fox Board Candidate Chellew’s Critchlow Connections Persist

4 Mar

Former Fox superintendent Jim Chellew is the latest in a line of Friends of Dianne Critchlow to run for Fox School Board since she resigned in disgrace in 2014 after news of her massive theft from the district emerged. He is running in the April 3 election. Chellew, in fact, is the one who got Critchlow the superintendent job. As the Leader put it:

When Chellew decided to retire in 2005, he championed Dianne Brown (Critchlow) as his successor. She was hired at $135,217, a salary that nearly doubled in nine years.

Chellew said at the time:

“She will be the finest superintendent the Fox district has ever had, and I sincerely mean that,” he said. “She is one of the brightest individuals I’ve ever worked with and the most talented. I believe the best for Fox is yet to come.”

Not only that, but she was the only applicant for the job, which was only advertised in the district. It’s like everyone else knew the fix was in and didn’t even bother to apply.

Some might say, well, he didn’t know she would go on to defraud the district. But I find it unlikely that Critchlow was a woman of morality, ethics, and virtue right up until the moment she decided to hatch a wide-ranging conspiracy to rob the district blind.

Furthermore, Chellew’s support for Critchlow did not end when she assumed the superintendent job. In 2011 he attempted to persuade district critic Rich Simpson, he who caused the Fox scandal to be uncovered, to stop speaking out against the district. When that failed, Chellew apparently blabbed to Critchlow. We know this because Chellew was cited in the cease and desist letter that Critchlow got the district’s law firm to send to Simpson (and three other district critics) threatening them with lawsuits if they continued to use their free speech rights to criticize school district administrators. From the letter sent to Simpson:

“As an additional example, you approached a former Superintendent of the District in a public setting. Among other things, you informed him that it was your intention to see that two of the District’s administrators were fired.”

Simpson recounted that conversation here. In the post, he states that Chellew also said “he was the one that put Dianne in her position as superintendent and that he would fight to make sure that she didn’t get fired.”

Would Critchlow still be superintendent today if Simpson had listened to Chellew?

This activity seems to belie the politician non-answer Chellew gave on Facebook when questioned by Simpson and myself about his Critchlow connections and whether he would attempt to recover any of her illicit gains:


Still Supporters

It is also interesting to see who is pledging their support for Chellew’s campaign:


Brengle, a retired Fox assistant principal, was one of the people caught leaving nasty anonymous comments on the Topix web page targeting Simpson and other Fox critics.


And there’s the big kahuna herself, Dianne (Critchlow) Salsman, expressing her public support for Chellew.

Why It Matters

Some might say about this issue, “who cares, time to move on.” But the thing is, Critchlow’s attorney has threatened to sue the school district, claiming she is the victim. This is from January 2017:

“It is time for the public’s and the media’s outrage to focus on the true wrongdoers – the people who lied to and deceived them, humiliated and embarrassed Fox C-6 School District, and defamed an innocent, life-long public servant,” Barth said in the statement. “We intend to hold all of the responsible parties accountable in a court of law.”

I realize that statement will cause a lot of you to laugh and/or puke. This is, however, a serious threat. These days, lawsuits against local government entities are not heard in the courtroom, they are settled in the boardroom. Look at the many lawsuits the city of Arnold has been party to, or look at how the Pevely mayor scored herself a big settlement from the city. In these examples, cushy relationships between elected and appointed officials allowed for paydays that would have been unlikely had a judge been involved

So what happens if a bunch of Critchlow pals make it to the school board? Will they give her a big settlement? That is why this issue is so important.

Answers Needed

People generally seem to think Chellew did a good job as Fox superintendent. Here is what the Leader said:

He did a great job mending fences, got tax issues passed to pay for major facility upgrades and generally restored sanity and confidence.

Winning a tax hike being, I guess, the modern measure of superintendent success (will he support another Fox tax hike?). That and not stealing. But even with that being the case, the Critchlow issue is a cloud over him.

Chellew so far refuses to comment on his Critchlow ties. At the very least, he needs to tell us if he thinks she did anything wrong, or if instead he agrees with Dianne’s lawyer that she is a totally innocent victim. He also needs to denounce any support for his campaign from her or her cronies. Finally, he really should admit he made a large mistake in making her superintendent. Then he can put the Critchlow issue behind him.

Dem Win in Special Election – What Does It Really Mean

20 Feb

Two weeks ago, a special election was held in Missouri House district 97, which covers parts of Arnold and Fenton, including a small slice of St. Louis County. The election was necessary because Rep. John McCaherty (GOP), who was in his 4th and final term in that seat (due to term limits), resigned to focus on his run for county executive, which he has since decided to back out of.

In the special election, Democrat Mike Revis defeated Republican David Linton in an upset. Revis brought in 51.5% of the vote and won with a 108-vote margin.

Of course, this got Democrats excited, even on the national level, sure that this means a blue wave is coming in November. Some examples:

I think the Trump comparison is not that relevant. Trump was running against Hillary Clinton. If Clinton had run as the candidate in district 97, she would have lost big there once again. Instead, the local Democratic party nominated a moderate candidate who touts his NRA membership. And using the presidential election results to suggest that the 97th district is “deeply red” is erroneous. Keep in mind that McCaherty was a firm no on right-to-work legislation, reflecting the views of the district.

And Trump was not running either. Instead, the county GOP committee, a sclerotic, pro-establishment bunch that is primarily interested in getting themselves re-elected to the committee and that probably thought Jeb Bush would win the 2016 GOP nomination, chose a candidate who was blamed by at least one person for losing the seat:

Rep. Kevin Engler, R-Farmington, blamed the Jefferson County loss on a weak candidate.

“I’ve won a lot of Democratic races for Republicans,” Engler said. “In order to do that, you have to outwork your opponent, not kind of work your opponent.”

Some blamed Governor Greitens and his current scandal for the loss:

It should also be noted that 14,000 people voted in this race in 2016, when McCaherty had no Democrat opponent, versus the 3,500 that voted in the special election. While the labor union troops that were reportedly out in full force in this campaign can make a big difference in a low-turnout race, I think their efforts will be insufficient come November 2018.

Comments on Lawsuit Column

12 Feb

Peggy Bess had a column in the February 1 Leader about the big legal bills being rung up by our county government in Hillsboro. I want to make three comments on the article.

First, in tallying up the costs, she doesn’t even add in the impact of the biggest lawsuit: the one concerning politician pay. Bess comes up with a total dollar amount of $83,610 for the Waller lawsuit – that he lost – over who could remove certain board members. But only about a week previously, Steve Taylor, also of the Leader, gave a total bill of over $150,000 for the two cases combined. It seems like mentioning the pay lawsuit would have only bolstered her point.

Second, the article attempts to place blame for these bills evenly between county executive Ken Waller and the county council. But the fact is, Waller is the one filing and participating in lawsuits. He filed the lawsuit Bess mentions. In the column, Bess casually dismisses the result of the lawsuit: “wow, that matters,” she sarcastically notes. But Waller lost because the issue wasn’t even ripe (ready for judicial involvement, since no board member had actually been removed). So it was a totally frivolous lawsuit, filed by Waller in a fit of pique, that is costing county taxpayers so much money. You can’t blame the council for that.

The other lawsuit, that continues to cost big bucks, is the suit by many current and former county officeholders asking for more money. Waller joined in this suit, and later left it under public and media pressure. Again, the council has no choice but to defend taxpayers, or this suit could cost the county $1 million or more in back pay. Once again, Bess should blame the plaintiffs, not the defendants.

Finally, Bess mentions that which is odd about the Missouri Attorney General’s sunshine lawsuit against councilwoman Renee Reuter, alleging that she ordered legal invoices to be destroyed. Namely:

  • The documents were not destroyed and have been provided to parties including the Leader.
  • “Under past Missouri attorneys general, Sunshine Law suits were hardly ever filed.” In one case a few years back in which Arnold violated the sunshine law by refusing to hand over city hall visitors logs, the AG threatened a lawsuit unless the records were handed over, giving Arnold a way out. But the current AG skipped this step.

On another note, not mentioned in the article, is that emails are presumably backed up on the server, and so cannot just be deleted from your desktop. And Reuter would surely know this. Also, the order to delete them allegedly came over the phone, so it comes down to a she said/she said situation. Questionable.

Bills from Our Reps

2 Feb

With the new legislative session underway (and overshadowed by the Governor Greitens affair scandal), let’s take a look at the bills the representatives from JeffCo have introduced. Most of these bills cover several items; I will highlight ones that I find interesting. The below information can be found here. I wil talk about our senators in another post.

Elaine Gannon (Republican, 115th district, from DeSoto)

  • HB 1365 – Allows parents to opt students out of standardized testing. Gannon was a teacher.
  • HB 1606 – Requires school districts to develop policies for accelerated student advancement
  • HB 2182 – Requires counties and cities to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program

Ben Harris (D, 118th, Hillsboro) – None

97th district – John McCaherty’s old seat, he resigned, now vacant. Special election will be February 6.

Shane Roden (R, 111th, Cedar Hill)

  • HB 1461 – Creates presumption that firefighters who were exposed to carcinogens and got cancer incurred the cancer on the job. This has the governor’s support. Roden is a volunteer firefighter.
  • HB 1462 – Removes residency and specific training program requirements for public safety jobs
  • HB 1913 – Gives businesses tax deductions for installing diaper-changing stations in mens or unisex public bathrooms
  • HB 1914 – Would overturn the recent transition of the St. Louis Police Department to local control, putting a state-appointed board back in charge
  • HB 1915 – Increases penalties for violating no-call list rules
  • HB 2113 – Prohibts some charges by water supply districts
  • HB 2158 – Allows motorcyclists to not wear a helmet if they have insurance and can prove financial responsibility. This is a pet issue for Roden.

Becky Ruth (R, 114th, Festus)

  • HB 1373 – Requires a teacher representative on the state board of education. Ruth was a teacher.
  • HB 1374 – Establishes a waterways trust fund
  • HB 1375 – Makes June 27 “Post Traumatic Stress Awareness Day”
  • HB 1796 – Establishes the First-Time Home Buyer Savings Account Act and authorizes a tax deduction. Ruth is a realtor.
  • HB 1830 – Increases minimum teacher salaries
  • HB 1831 – Adds diapers to the list of exempt items on back to school tax free weekend in August
  • HB 1927 – Requires the Department of Health and Senior Services to develop a voluntary nonopioid directive form to allow a person to refuse the administration or prescription of opioids

Dan Shaul (R, 113th, Imperial)

  • HB 1396 – Expands his ban on plastic bag bans from two years ago to other types of containers (cloth, paper, plastic, glass, etc)
  • HB 1397 – Prevents cities/counties from penalizing employers who alter or adjust employee schedules. I believe this relates to a push in some states to prevent employers from making short-notice changes to employee’s shift schedules.
  • HB 1570 – Requires state agencies to reduce impact of new regulations on small businesses
  • HB 1857 – Makes changes in election laws, including moving the absentee ballot deadline back a week and changing provisions about removal of names from ballots and paying election costs
  • HB 2121 – Extends the holding period for people arrested from 24 to 72 hours if the arrestee is a danger to himself or others
  • HB 2277 – Exempts permanently disabled persons from the requirement that a physician’s statement be provided each time a disabled license plate or windshield placard is renewed
  • HCR 64 – Urges Congress to pass a bill to allow the Delta Queen riverboat, which is moving to Kimmswick, to operate
  • HRB 1 – Repeals obsolete, expired, sunset, and terminated statutory sections and portions of sections

Rob Vescovo (R, 112th, Arnold) – serving as House Majority Leader  – None

Colorful Prosecutor Running for Top Job

23 Jan

Jefferson County assistant prosecutor Thomas Hollingsworth, who works DWI cases, has announced he will run for prosecuting attorney as a Democrat in 2018, according to the January 11 Leader. There are already two declared Republican candidates – Mark Bishop and Trisha Stefanski.

I have a suggestion for Hollingsworth: since he prosecuted Jame Critchlow’s DWI case last year, his campaign slogan should be “I actually put a Critchlow in jail” – you know, unlike his boss, outgoing prosecutor Forrest Wegge (Democrat).

I was on a jury a couple of years ago for a case in which Hollingsworth was the prosecutor. I found him to be an effective and entertaining courtroom operator, and he won the case. You can take a look at him here, addressing the November 13 county council meeting during the public comments about increasing employee health insurance costs.

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